spot_crisis
Available Documents:
DoDEA Crisis Management Guide
The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) Crisis Management Guide is a resource designed to assist school administrators and other personnel in understanding effective crisis management procedures and the role of the crisis management team. A major focus of the guide is on Incident Response Planning.
 
Psychological First Aid for Schools
When bad things happen children and adolescents are the most vulnerable victims
Resources for Support in Response to the tragedy at Sandy Hook ES

sandy hook imageWe are all reeling with shock at the senseless tragedy that occurred on Friday at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The tragedy impacts all of us, especially our school-level administrators, educators, and support personnel who are on the front line educating our children every day. We know all too well of the innocence, joy, hopes, and dreams of young children who are in our elementary classrooms. Each day, our educators inspire our precious children, nurture their dreams, and prepare them to fulfill their aspirations. I can only imagine how heartbreaking it will be for them and our children on Monday morning as they all begin another day filled with hope, promise and fulfillment.

On Monday, our schools will open with all of us feeling a bit more vulnerable. Our schools will activate their crisis action teams to assist anyone who needs extra support in dealing with the terrible tragedy in Newtown, Connecticut. Our Employee Assistance Program will be ready to serve our employees wherever they may serve in DoDEA. We have posted resources on our Facebook page and our website, which  may provide insight and assistance for our personnel in coping with this tragedy.

As we start our week, I ask that we all redouble our efforts to ensure a safe and secure learning environment for our students and employees – our top priority. Undoubtedly, our students, families, employees and community will need reassurance about the safety of our schools. Although our schools are on military installations, adding an extra measure of security, I ask that you review our procedures and suggestions described in our “Safe Schools Program.” For those of us who are not located in schools but who support our schools each day, let’s review our policies, processes and programs, too, to ensure safe and secure learning environments.

We are poised to assist in any way we can. If anyone perceives a gap in our support, please . We are all part of an honored fellowship which devotes each day to the care, well-being, and education of the children of our Nation’s heroes. We do this with compassion, intelligence and abiding commitment. I am grateful and humbled by the honorable service of our all of our employees. You are in my thoughts and prayers as you continue your work on behalf of the military families we serve.

Marilee Fitzgerald,
Director


Suggested Resources

A National Tragedy
Helping Children Cope - Tips for Parents and Educators
 
Coping with Crisis
Helping Children with Special Needs
 
President Obama Remarks
Remarks at the Vigil Service on December 16th
 
Talking to Children About Violence: Tips for Parents and Teachers (PDF)
High profile acts of violence, particularly in schools, can confuse and frighten children who may feel in danger or worry that their friends or loved-ones are at risk. They will look to adults for information and guidance on how to react. Parents and school personnel can help children feel safe by establishing a sense of normalcy and security and talking with them about their fears.
 
Tips for School Administrators for Reinforcing School Safety (PDF)
School principals and superintendents can provide leadership in reassuring students, staff, and parents that schools are generally very safe places for children and youth and reiterating what safety measures and student supports are already in place in their school.
 
Tips for Talking to Children about the Connecticut School Shooting
There are no "right" or "wrong" ways to talk with children about such traumatic events. However, here are some suggestions that may be helpful

 
Other resources for coping with tragedy

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
The AACAP (American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry) is the leading national professional medical association dedicated to treating and improving the quality of life for children, adolescents, and families affected by these disorders.
 
APA: Managing Distress in the Aftermath of a Shooting
You may be struggling to understand how a shooting could occur and why such a terrible thing would happen. There may never be satisfactory answers to these questions, but here are some tips to cope.
 
ASCA: American School Counselors Association
The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) supports school counselors' efforts to help students focus on academic, personal/social and career development so they achieve success in school and are prepared to lead fulfilling lives as responsible members of society.
 
Helping Children Cope with Crisis - Care for the Caregiver (PDF)
It almost goes without saying that parents, teachers, and other caregivers play a critical role in helping children cope with crises. The natural instinct is to put one’s own needs aside and tend to children first. It is extremely important, however, for caregivers to monitor their own reactions and take care of their own needs. Failure to do so can result in burnout, which interferes with one’s ability to provide crisis intervention assistance.
 
Listen, Protect, and Connect (PDF)
Psychological First Aid for students and teachers
 
NASP: National Association of School Psychologists
The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) empowers school psychologists by advancing effective practices to improve students’ learning, behavior, and mental health.
 
President's Weekly Address
Nation Grieves for Those Killed in Tragic Shooting in Newtown
 
Resources for Parents following Traumatic Events
A list of resources put together by the Department of Education specifically designed for parents and guardians to provide guidance on talking to children following a traumatic event.
 
Talking to Children about the recent spate of school shootings
Few events hit home for children and families like a school shooting. When children see such an event on television or on Web-based news flashes, it is natural for them to worry about their own school and their own safety, particularly if the violence occurred nearby or in a neighboring city or state.